Blogger Susan Artes says goodbye

By Susan Artes, April 19, 2015


Susan Artes and U.S. coach Robert Ridland
As the curtain comes down on the 2015 Longines FEI World Cup Show Jumping Final, I am thankful to have been a part of it. Being given the opportunity to walk the courses allowed me strategize as though I'd be riding Zamiro. While the jumps were definitely big and wide for the last day, the riders were up for the challenge.

Rich Fellers and the 19-year-old Flexible had two down in each round this afternoon, but still showed the world that it is possible to be competitive with a senior horse.

I'm really proud of Vinton Karrasch, who took my place when Zamiro got hurt. He got better with each passing day. My heart jumped every jump with him, and I could tell by his smile as he left the arena that he was happy with his round. He finished 22d.

It was certainly a tense moment as the winner, Steve Guerdat of Switzerland, toppled a rail at the last jump, barely making the time allowed. Had he been a few fractions of a second slower, we would have had a jump off between three riders tied with nine faults.

With three U.S. riders placed in the top ten, I'm sure our team coach, Robert Ridland, is still pretty pleased, even though we didn't win.


Blogger Susan Artes says goodbye

By Susan Artes, September 17, 2016


Susan Artes and U.S. coach Robert Ridland
As the curtain comes down on the 2015 Longines FEI World Cup Show Jumping Final, I am thankful to have been a part of it. Being given the opportunity to walk the courses allowed me strategize as though I'd be riding Zamiro. While the jumps were definitely big and wide for the last day, the riders were up for the challenge.

Rich Fellers and the 19-year-old Flexible had two down in each round this afternoon, but still showed the world that it is possible to be competitive with a senior horse.

I'm really proud of Vinton Karrasch, who took my place when Zamiro got hurt. He got better with each passing day. My heart jumped every jump with him, and I could tell by his smile as he left the arena that he was happy with his round. He finished 22d.

It was certainly a tense moment as the winner, Steve Guerdat of Switzerland, toppled a rail at the last jump, barely making the time allowed. Had he been a few fractions of a second slower, we would have had a jump off between three riders tied with nine faults.

With three U.S. riders placed in the top ten, I'm sure our team coach, Robert Ridland, is still pretty pleased, even though we didn't win.


A difficult course set the U.S. riders a challenge at the FEI Jumping World Cup Final

By Susan Artes, April 18, 2015


Blogger Susan Artes with Vinton Karrasch, who replaced her in the final after her horse was hurt and she had to withdraw
What a night for the Americans on our home turf!

Last evening's course appeared daunting; even the German team coach, with who I talked, thought it would prove very difficult, more so than in years past.

One needed a bit of luck in addition to the right plan to survive the last line going into the triple combination. It walked in five and a half strides, so one had to choose whether five or six strides would be best for their horse.

I would have preferred five for Zamiro, but regardless of the number, it had to be executed flawlessly.

I joined the rest of the house tonight standing up in recognition of Flexible and Rich Fellers' clear trip in the first round. It was the sort of thing we all dream of.


Course Walk Before FEI World Cup Jumping Finals Speed Class

By Susan Artes, April 16, 2015

I remember walking the courses for the finals in 2007 and 2009. My recollections were that the arena was impossibly small, and back then I felt it would be extremely difficult.

I've come a long way as a rider since, so I figured it would look easier to me this time around. But it didn't.

In my conversation with Anthony D' Ambrosio, the course designer, we agreed that there was no specific place on the course that should cause a problem. Indeed the faults were spread out along the course. In my opinion the left turn rollback to the double, 5a and 5b, was challenging.

There weren't many options on course to make up time, so the clockings were very close between the top few placings. Since the format was Table C (faults converted into seconds), riders needed to make an effort to be fast. A very fast round with one jump down can still beat a clear round that is conservative, though that didn't happen at the top of the order.

The energy of the crowd was great tonight, and when the 19-year-old Flexible cruised to an easy clear round for second place, I know I wasn't the only one with goosebumps.

The jumps get bigger and wider for the next round, so the margin for error will become less. We'll see tonight who is ready for the test.


A Different Perspective

By Susan Artes, April 13, 2015


Susie’s partner and the kids at the barn made her a practice jump for the World Cup, but now they have painted over the original 2015 date they put on it so she can use it for next year’s Cup | Photo courtesy of Susie Artes
Our blogger, Susie Artes, is gearing up to attend the Longines FEI World Cup Show Jumping finals, but not the way she had hoped to go. Although she finished second in the North American West Coast League to qualify for the finals, her full-steam-ahead trip to Las Vegas was derailed when her mount, Zamiro, came up with a slight injury.

But the indefatigable Susie, good sport that she is, will be in Vegas anyway to support the U.S. riders and fill you in on the inside view of the competition from a professional's vantagepoint. Here's her first blog as she prepares for her trip; be sure to check back for her other comments this week.

Ok, I admit it.

It makes me sad to see that horses from around the globe are arriving on U.S. soil for the Longines FEI World Cup Show Jumping Finals, knowing that Zamiro and I should have been among them.


Zamiro is hanging out and taking a rest when he isn’t walking under tack | Photo copyright by Alison Dyer
Of course, Zamiro doesn't have a clue of what we're missing -- he's just becoming rambunctious in our daily tack walk routine.

It was bittersweet when I tried on my new riding coat in preparation for representing the U.S. Hopefully, it will still fit when I get my next chance.

But my disappointment is wearing off, and I'm gearing up to walk the courses, an opportunity to learn and absorb as much as I can from the experience so that it won't feel brand new when I qualify the next time.

I'm excited for all the ambitious riders who have never had the opportunity to see what real international showjumping is. We don't get a chance to see this level on the West Coast very often, and it will inspire many to pursue their dreams. I hope to see you all there!


Let's Get Social

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Instagram

Twitter

PARTNERS
Save
Subscribe Today
Equine Network