Add Your Voice to a Equine Survey - Expert how-to for English Riders

Add Your Voice to a Equine Survey

Give your input to an international online survey from the International Society for Equitation Science.
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Is the relationship between a horse and rider the same around the world? The International Society for Equitation Science is conducting a survey to answer this and other equine-related questions. | © Amy K. Dragoo/arnd.nl

Is the relationship between a horse and rider the same around the world? The International Society for Equitation Science is conducting a survey to answer this and other equine-related questions. | © Amy K. Dragoo/arnd.nl

How do your views on horse care stack up against the views of others? Is the horse-rider relationship the same the world over, or does it differ from place to place? The International Society for Equitation Science is hoping to find answers to those and other questions through an online survey, and the group is encouraging as many people as possible to take part.

The project builds on a study published in 2011 that described how Dutch horse enthusiasts differ in their emotional involvement with horses, the ways they search for information, and their attitudes, knowledge, beliefs and daily practices regarding equine welfare issues. Paul McGreevy, a professor of veterinary science at the University of Sydney, Australia, is conducting the new international survey. You can access it through the ISES web site at http://www.equitationscience.com/announcements/equine-management-survey.The survey asks for information about your age, gender, geographic location, education, experience, involvement with and management of horses and where you obtain information about their care. You can answer anonymously, and responses are confidential. If you choose, you can provide your name and email address to receive the survey results and to enter a drawing for a prize—a year’s membership in ISES, a not-for-profit organization that facilitates research into horse training and welfare and the horse-rider relationship.

This article originally appeared in the September 2014 issue of Practical Horseman.

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