Practical Horseman Podcast: Phillip Dutton

Phillip Dutton discusses how the sport of eventing has evolved since his first Olympics to now and shares his thoughts on the future of eventing in the U.S. and the direction he believes the sport needs to move in.

This week’s episode, brought to you by Cosequin Equine, is with renowned international eventer, Phillip Dutton.

Originally from Australia, Dutton grew up competing at Pony Club rallies and horse trials during his childhood and teenage years, and continued to pursue riding while studying at university. In 1991, Dutton moved to the United States to continue his training and prepare for the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, where he won his first Olympic gold medal as a part of Australia’s eventing team. In 2006, Dutton became an American citizen and changed his competitive nationality so that he would be eligible to represent the United States.

Over the course of his career, Dutton has represented Australia and the United States in a combined seven Olympic Games and has earned 2 gold medals and one bronze. In addition to his Olympic medals, Dutton has won team gold at two World Equestrian Games and one individual silver. He’s also been to six World Championships and has racked up accolades including 13 USEA Leading Rider of the Year awards, Developing Rider Coach of the Year in 2009, and countless wins and top placings at three-star, four-star and five-star events.

In this episode, brought you by Cosequin Equine, Dutton discusses how the sport of eventing has evolved since his first Olympics in Atlanta in 1996 to now, his most recent Olympics, in Tokyo in 2021. He also shares his thoughts on the future of eventing here in the United States and the direction he believes the sport needs to move in.

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