How Not to Panic if Your Horse Colics

If he's pawing the ground, rolling, sweating and/or nipping at his sides, it may be Colic. Here's what to do

Colic Basics: How To React if Your Horse Shows Signs of Intestinal Distress.

You’re at the barn and you notice your horse seems to be acting strangely. He’s pawing the ground, rolling, sweating and he doesn’t seem to be interested in food. All your instincts point towards colic! Naturally, your first reaction may be to panic. Try not to. Take a breath, call the veterinarian and get your horse comfortable and ready for the vet. Not only can this save valuable time (which in colic cases can be the difference between a successful treatment and losing the horse) but, it will also keep everyone safe at a time when emotions and anxiety is high. 

Do You Keep Your Veterinarian’s Phone Number Handy?
Do you know your local vets number? Make sure you have it saved to your phone as well as written down on an emergency barn phone number list. (The barn list should be kept highly visible for emergencies.) Make sure you provide the veterinary practice with your correct address along with any tricky directions, should they have a GPS fail. This can save valuable minutes and seconds as the vet makes his/her way to your barn. 

Read more at Spalding-Labs.com

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